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Fry Scholarship

Definition

The Fry Scholarship, also known as the Marine Gunnery Sergeant John David Fry Scholarship, is a financial aid program for the dependents of U.S. service members who died in the line of duty after September 10, 2001. It offers educational benefits, including tuition assistance and a monthly housing allowance, for eligible spouses and children. The scholarship aims to provide up to 36 months of full Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits, helping recipients pursue their educational goals.

Key Takeaways

  1. The Fry Scholarship is a financial assistance program for dependents of deceased service members who died in the line of duty after September 10, 2001. It is named after Marine Gunnery Sergeant John David Fry, who was killed in Iraq in 2006.
  2. The scholarship offers educational benefits similar to the Post-9/11 GI Bill, which can help cover tuition, housing, and other educational costs for eligible dependents. Beneficiaries can receive up to 36 months of benefits at the 100% level.
  3. To be eligible for the Fry Scholarship, a dependent must be a child or spouse of a deceased service member and not be eligible for the Yellow Ribbon Program. Children must be between the ages of 18 and 33 to receive this benefit, while spouses have 15 years from the date of the service member’s death to use the benefit.

Importance

The Fry Scholarship, named in honor of Marine Gunnery Sergeant John David Fry, is an essential VA benefits term because it provides substantial financial support for post-secondary education to the surviving spouses and children of service members who died in the line of duty after September 10, 2001.

Recognizing the sacrifices made by the fallen heroes and their families, the Fry Scholarship covers tuition, fees, housing, and other educational expenses through the Post-9/11 GI Bill.

This program ultimately allows eligible recipients to access quality education, preparing them for a better future, and preserving the legacy of those who made the ultimate sacrifice for their country.

Explanation

The Fry Scholarship serves a noble purpose, designed to support and honor the families of fallen service members in the U.S. military.

Named after Marine Gunnery Sergeant John David Fry, who made the ultimate sacrifice in Iraq in 2006, this program aims to provide educational assistance to the children and spouses of service members killed in the line of duty. By offering this form of support, the Fry Scholarship intends to alleviate the financial burden of pursuing higher education for these families and express gratitude to those who have lost a loved one in service to the nation.

The Fry Scholarship extends comprehensive coverage for the beneficiaries, including support for tuition fees, housing, and additional expenses like books and supplies. The program stands as a testament to the commitment of the U.S.

Department of Veterans Affairs in honoring the families of these fallen heroes, providing them access to valuable education opportunities and a brighter future. This scholarship is not only a financial aid program but also a tribute to the lives and sacrifices of those who have served, acknowledging the impact of their loss on their families and working to ensure their loved ones have the support they need to thrive.

Examples of Fry Scholarship

The Fry Scholarship, officially known as the Marine Gunnery Sergeant John David Fry Scholarship, is a benefit provided under the Post-9/11 GI Bill for the children and spouses of service members who died in the line of duty after September 10,Here are three real-world examples of how the Fry Scholarship has benefited individuals:

Jane’s father, a U.S. Army soldier, was killed in action in Afghanistan inAs a high school senior, Jane applied for the Fry Scholarship to aid her in attending college. After being deemed eligible, she received full tuition coverage, a monthly housing allowance, and a stipend for books and supplies. Through the Fry Scholarship, Jane was able to attend her dream college without the financial burden that many students face.

After her husband, a U.S. Marine, was killed during a deployment in Iraq in 2005, Amanda was left to care for their two young children. When Amanda decided to go back to school to better support her family, she discovered the Fry Scholarship. Amanda applied and was awarded the scholarship, which covered her tuition expenses as well as provided a housing allowance and book stipend. Amanda eventually graduated with a degree in nursing, which allowed her to obtain a well-paying job and support her family.When his father, an Air Force pilot, died in a training accident in 2012, Michael was devastated. As he prepared to graduate high school and begin college, Michael learned about the Fry Scholarship. With the financial assistance provided by the scholarship, Michael was able to attend a top engineering school, ultimately graduating with honors and securing a job with a respected aerospace company.

Fry Scholarship FAQ

1. What is the Fry Scholarship?

The Fry Scholarship is a program offered by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to provide financial assistance for the education and training of eligible dependents, as well as surviving spouses of service members who died in the line of duty on or after September 11, 2001.

2. Who is eligible for the Fry Scholarship?

Dependent children and surviving spouses of active-duty service members who died in the line of duty on or after September 11, 2001 are eligible for the Fry Scholarship. The scholarship may be used by eligible recipients who are pursuing a degree, certificate, or other approved education and training program at a qualified institution.

3. What benefits does the Fry Scholarship provide?

The Fry Scholarship provides beneficiaries with up to 36 months of benefits that include full payment of tuition and fees for in-state tuition at public institutions, a monthly housing allowance, and a stipend for books and supplies. These benefits are usually available for eligible individuals within 15 years of the service member’s death, and may be used for undergraduate, graduate, vocational, technical, and training programs.

4. How do you apply for the Fry Scholarship?

To apply for the Fry Scholarship, individuals may submit an application through the Department of Veterans Affairs’ online application system (VA.gov) or by downloading, completing, and mailing VA Form 22-5490 to the appropriate regional processing office. It is recommended to provide supporting documents such as a Certificate of Eligibility (COE) or a letter from the military service confirming the service member’s death in the line of duty.

5. Can you use the Fry Scholarship and the GI Bill at the same time?

No, recipients cannot receive both the Fry Scholarship and GI Bill benefits at the same time. However, eligible individuals may choose to use either the Fry Scholarship or the GI Bill benefits, depending on their specific needs and goals. It is important to carefully review the details of both programs to determine which option is most appropriate for your situation.

6. What happens if I don’t use the Fry Scholarship benefits within the 15-year period?

If an eligible individual does not use the Fry Scholarship benefits within the 15-year period following the service member’s death, the unused benefits will expire. In certain cases, the Department of Veterans Affairs may grant an extension to the expiration date if deemed appropriate due to exceptional circumstances. It is always recommended to consult with a VA representative to review specific situations and eligibility requirements.

Related VA Benefit Terms

  • Post-9/11 GI Bill
  • Surviving Dependent Education Assistance Program
  • Veteran Affairs Education Benefits
  • Marine Gunnery Sergeant John David Fry
  • Service Members Opportunity Colleges (SOC)

Sources for More Information