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Medal of Honor Pension

Definition

The Medal of Honor Pension is a financial benefit provided to recipients of the Medal of Honor, the United States’ highest military honor. This pension is awarded in recognition of the recipient’s extraordinary valor and gallantry in action. The amount is determined by Congress and is paid monthly to the honoree, in addition to any other retirement or disability pay they may receive.

Key Takeaways

  1. The Medal of Honor Pension is a monetary benefit provided to recipients of the Medal of Honor, the highest military decoration for valor in the U.S. Armed Forces.
  2. The pension is awarded in monthly payments in recognition of their extraordinary heroism and is adjusted annually for inflation. As of December 1, 2019, the monthly amount is $1,334.13.
  3. Medal of Honor recipients also receive additional benefits, such as increased travel benefits, eligibility for burial at Arlington National Cemetery, and invitations to Presidential inaugurations.

Importance

The term “Medal of Honor Pension” is important because it refers to a valuable financial benefit provided to those who have been awarded the prestigious Medal of Honor for their acts of valor, courage, and self-sacrifice in service to their country.

This pension, granted by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), serves as a lifetime monetary compensation and a symbol of gratitude from the nation, acknowledging and rewarding the extraordinary service and sacrifices made by these remarkable individuals.

The pension ensures that these distinguished veterans receive the support and recognition they deserve for their contributions and helps them maintain a comfortable and dignified quality of life in their post-service years.

Explanation

The Medal of Honor Pension is a special benefit that serves as a means to honor and support the exemplary courage and dedication exhibited by recipients of the Medal of Honor. This award is the highest military decoration in the United States and is bestowed upon military personnel who have demonstrated extraordinary acts of valor in combat.

The pension intends to assist these exceptional individuals in their civilian life by providing them with financial stability and security as a token of gratitude for their unsurpassed service to the nation. By instituting this pension, the government underscores the invaluable contributions made by these heroes and bolsters the appreciation for their self-sacrifice and dedication.

The purpose of the Medal of Honor Pension goes beyond simple monetary compensation; it reinforces the importance of recognizing and honoring the bravery of those who have gone above and beyond the call of duty in safeguarding the freedoms and values that the United States stands for. Furthermore, the pension serves as an expression of the collective respect and admiration that the American people hold for these decorated warriors.

By offering financial support, the pension aims to ease the burden faced by the recipients as they transition into civilian life and ensure that their sacrifices are not forgotten. Ultimately, the Medal of Honor Pension stands not only as a symbol of recognition, but also as a tangible commitment to the overall well-being of these extraordinary individuals who have unyieldingly defended the nation.

Examples of Medal of Honor Pension

The Medal of Honor Pension is a special benefit given to recipients of the Medal of Honor, the highest military award for valor in the United States. Here are three real-world examples involving the Medal of Honor Pension:

Hershel W. Williams:Hershel W. Williams is a retired U.S. Marine who received the Medal of Honor for his extraordinary heroism during the Battle of Iwo Jima in World War II. Being a Medal of Honor recipient, Williams is eligible for the Medal of Honor Pension, which provides him with additional financial assistance, along with other special benefits.

Colonel Jack Jacobs:Colonel Jack Jacobs is a retired U.S. Army officer who received the Medal of Honor for his actions during the Vietnam War. As a Medal of Honor recipient, Colonel Jacobs is eligible for the Medal of Honor Pension. This pension benefit can help support his retirement and provide a valuable supplement to his other military pension.

Retired U.S. Air Force Master Sergeant John A. Chapman:Master Sergeant Chapman received the Medal of Honor posthumously for his actions during the Battle of Takur Ghar in Afghanistan. As a Medal of Honor recipient, his surviving spouse (if not remarried), is eligible to receive the Medal of Honor Pension after his death. The pension would provide additional financial assistance to his spouse, along with other privileges and benefits reserved for the families of Medal of Honor recipients.

FAQ – Medal of Honor Pension

What is the Medal of Honor Pension?

The Medal of Honor Pension is a special benefit provided to veterans who have received the Medal of Honor for their extraordinary valor in military service. The pension is a tax-free, monthly financial payment provided to eligible recipients by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA).

Who is eligible for the Medal of Honor Pension?

Any veteran who is a recipient of the Medal of Honor and has served in the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, or Coast Guard is eligible for the Medal of Honor Pension. Additionally, surviving spouses and family members of Medal of Honor recipients may also be eligible for certain benefits.

How much is the Medal of Honor Pension?

The monthly pension amount for Medal of Honor recipients varies and is adjusted each year based on cost-of-living increases. As of December 1, 2021, the monthly pension rate is $1,406.73. However, it is important to check with the VA for current rates and eligibility requirements.

How do I apply for the Medal of Honor Pension?

To apply for the Medal of Honor Pension, you can submit VA Form 21-534EZ, Application for Dependency and Indemnity Compensation (DIC), Death Pension, and Accrued Benefits by a Surviving Spouse or Child. This form can be found on the VA website and can be submitted online, by mail, or in person at your local VA regional office.

Does the Medal of Honor Pension affect other VA benefits?

Receiving the Medal of Honor Pension does not generally affect other VA benefits. However, the VA may consider the Medal of Honor Pension as income when determining eligibility for certain need-based benefits. It is recommended to consult with your VA representative to discuss how the Medal of Honor Pension may impact your specific situation.

Related VA Benefit Terms

  • Service-Connected Disability Compensation
  • Survivors Pension
  • Dependency and Indemnity Compensation (DIC)
  • Special Monthly Pension Benefits
  • Disabled Veterans Property Tax Exemptions

Sources for More Information

  • U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs: The official website of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs provides information about Medal of Honor pensions, as well as other VA benefits.
  • Congress.gov: The official source for federal legislative information, where you can find up-to-date information about Medal of Honor pension legislation and related policy changes.
  • Military.com: A comprehensive online resource on military and veterans benefits, including information about the Medal of Honor pension and its eligibility criteria.
  • Military Officers Association of America (MOAA): This organization serves the military community and provides information on various benefits – including the Medal of Honor pension – available to veterans and their families.