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Direct air support center (airborne) (DASC(A))

Definition The Direct Air Support Center (Airborne) (DASC(A)) is a military term referring to a principal air control agency tasked with managing air operations directly supporting ground forces. This agency operates from a plane in the designated operational area, particularly beneficial in mobile, fluid warfare scenarios. It functions to process immediate requests for air support, […]

Definition

The Direct Air Support Center (Airborne) (DASC(A)) is a military term referring to a principal air control agency tasked with managing air operations directly supporting ground forces. This agency operates from a plane in the designated operational area, particularly beneficial in mobile, fluid warfare scenarios. It functions to process immediate requests for air support, coordinate aircraft operations, and control assigned and attached tactical aircraft.

Key Takeaways

  1. The Direct Air Support Center (Airborne) (DASC(A)) serves as the primary control center for the direction of air operations directly supporting ground forces.
  2. DASC(A) operates aboard an airborne platform, improving its mobility and survivability in a hostile environment while ensuring continuous communication with air and ground units.
  3. The key responsibilities of the DASC(A) include coordinating and controlling immediate air support missions, assisting in Search and Rescue (SAR) operations, keeping track of friendly and enemy situations, and advising on the best utilization of air resources.

Importance

The Direct Air Support Center (Airborne) (DASC(A)) is a critical element in military operations as it serves as the principal air control agency responsible for the direction of air operations directly supporting ground forces.

Operating from a platform that could be airborne, ground-based, or shipborne, DASC(A) aims to efficiently manage and control air traffic in and around the battlefield while ensuring effective utilization of air assets.

It handles immediate air requests from ground troops, swift communications among all parties involved in the operation, and coordinates with other air control agencies to minimize risk of fratricide.

Its flexible nature aids in the immediate and coordinated response, making it integral to successful military operations.

Explanation

Direct Air Support Center (Airborne) (DASC(A)) is a tactical unit integral to the operational efficiency of combined armed forces, especially in aerial warfare. The primary purpose of this center is to enhance an efficient, flexible, and timely process for managing airspace, and providing air support to units engaged in combat.

It virtually serves as an air traffic control center, specializing in managing local air resources, coordinating immediate air requests, and adjusting air missions in flight to suit rapidly changing situations on the ground. DASC(A)’s main function is to provide a responsive air control system that can easily adapt to the volatile circumstances in the battlefield.

This capability is particularly critical in modern warfare environment characterized by swift changes. By timely coordinating air support missions according to shifting demands, the DASC(A) significantly minimizes potential airspace conflicts, thereby ensuring seamless operations.

Furthermore, it facilitates air-ground integration, imperative for the comprehensive dominance of the battleground. The DASC(A) operates to ascertain that air support operations are executed safely, efficiently, and effectively, ultimately contributing to the overall success of military operations.

Examples of Direct air support center (airborne) (DASC(A))

The Direct Air Support Center (Airborne) (DASC(A)), also known as an Airborne Battlefield Command and Control Center, is a system that coordinates close air support and other air operations in support of ground forces. While specific operations involving DASC(A) can be classified and thus not publicly referenced, below are some generic scenarios reflecting the real-world use of DASC(A) in military operations:

Operation Desert Storm (1991): While it’s not directly stated, DASC(A) systems may have been used during Operation Desert Storm, the successful United States-led coalition to liberate Kuwait from Iraq. In such a large-scale operation, DASC(A) could have played a critical role in coordinating troop movements, deployment schedules, and necessary close air support.

NATO’s enforcement of No-Fly Zones in Bosnia (1993-1995): DASC(A) systems could have been in use for the coordination of airborne operations to ensure no unauthorized aircraft entered designated airspaces. The coordination between multiple nations and their respective military branches to enforce this no-fly zone would benefit immensely from such precise, shared coordination tools like DASC(A).

Contingency Operations in Afghanistan: In ongoing efforts against terrorist organizations in Afghanistan, DASC(A) could have helped direct air support missions across vast terrains and challenging geographic conditions. Close air support for troops fighting on harsh mountainous terrains may have been coordinated with the help of airborne DASC units.Please note these are hypothetical scenarios as detailed information about the concrete usage of DASC(A) in these operations is not publicly available due to security and confidentiality reasons.

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FAQ: Direct Air Support Center (Airborne) (DASC(A))

What is the Direct Air Support Center (Airborne) (DASC(A))?

The Direct Air Support Center (Airborne) (DASC(A)) is a principal air control agency of the Marine Air Command and Control System (MACCS) tasked with managing immediate air support for operations on the ground. It’s primarily airborne to maintain flexibility and mobility.

What is the role of the DASC(A)?

The DASC(A)’s role is crucial in providing a centralized coordination, direction, and control of aircraft and other air support assets involved in close air support to ground units. It serves as a coordination link between the aviation combat element and the ground combat element.

What information is processed by the DASC(A)?

The DASC(A) processes and enhances the effectiveness of air support by providing information such as real-time intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance data, threat updates, and in-flight mission changes. It also factors in ground unit requirements, aircraft availability and environment conditions.

Why is DASC(A) airborne?

DASC(A) is an airborne entity to maintain flexibility and mobility during combat operations. This allows it to deploy swiftly and provide air support coordination even in remote, forward, or rapidly changing environments.

Do all military operations have a DASC(A)?

Not all military operations employ a DASC(A). Its usage is determined by the specific needs and nature of a mission. Having a DASC(A) is particularly beneficial in large scale, complex, or high intensity battlefield scenarios where real-time air support is critical to the mission’s success.

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Related Military Operation Terms

  • Airborne Operations
  • Tactical Air Control System (TACS)
  • Military Air Traffic Control
  • Forward Air Control (FAC)
  • Air Support Operations

Sources for More Information

  • Global Security.org – Offers extensive information on military terms and operations.
  • The U.S. Navy – The official website of the United States Navy, it gives various resources related to military operations.
  • The U.S. Department of Defense – The official site of the Department of Defense. It hosts relevant policies, documents, and updates about military operations worldwide.
  • The Federation of American Scientists – A reliable resource for information on security matters, including military operations and terms.

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